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Have you seen videos of baby goats jumping on the Internet recently? These types of videos are shared around pretty often because of how cute they are.

Baby goats can certainly be adorable, but many people who don’t raise baby goats themselves wonder about how common this jumping behavior really is. Do baby goats really spend a lot of time jumping around just for fun?

Why would baby goats jump like this when there doesn’t appear to be a reason for it? Read on to get more information about jumping baby goats so that you can figure out the truth.

Once you know more about baby goats, you’ll be able to appreciate them even more. It might even make you think of those videos of the baby goats a bit different moving forward.

It’s a Playful Thing

For the most part, baby goats jump around because they like to play. People aren’t completely sure why goats like to jump, but it’s known that younger goats are more energetic and likely to play around by jumping.

You’ll still see older goats jumping around and climbing things, but baby goats are bundles of energy. They have a lot of energy to burn, and you’ll notice them jumping around at random times throughout the day.

Baby goats are often considered to be very fun to raise because of how playful they are. They like to jump around and climb just to have a bit of fun, and there isn’t a lot more to it than that.

Other than the obvious answer of goats having energy to use up, it’s not clear why baby goats love to jump as often as they do. Some people have theories about it, but there isn’t anything that has been scientifically confirmed.

Knowing this, it’s probably easiest to chalk the baby goats’ penchant for jumping to the fact that they think it’s fun. Most people who love raising baby goats agree that the jumping actions are playful in nature.

The baby goats will chill out a bit as they start to age, but the jumping and climbing inclinations will not disappear entirely. It’s really just something that goats like to do.

Goats Are Genetically Inclined to Jump and Climb

You should also consider that goats are genetically inclined to jump and climb. In nature, goats will use their jumping ability to get to high places, and they’re incredibly nimble overall.

Goats have absurdly good balance and many mountain goats are capable of balancing themselves on cliffsides that are quite narrow. This is a standard activity for goats, and you’re going to see them jumping and climbing while in captivity.

A goat being domesticated doesn’t mean that it won’t have a strong urge to jump and climb. They’re still going to want to do these things, and you’ll likely have a lot of fun observing them.

Baby goats are especially likely to play around while they’re learning about their jumping capabilities. Jumping is something that is coded into the genes of goats, so to speak.

Many baby goats will learn about jumping and climbing by jumping onto their parents. It isn’t unusual to see a baby goat jumping and climbing on its mother’s back.

This is a trait that goats have because they needed these skills out in the wild. Jumping and climbing helped goats to get food, and it gave them the ability to try to escape from predators.

It makes sense that baby goats would learn these skills fast, and some of the playing around that you see is about practical learning. Goats have instincts that tell them that they need these skills, and baby goats work to perfect their jumping and climbing skills pretty early on after being born.

It Can Be Hard to Keep Baby Goats From Jumping

Some people try to raise baby goats just for fun or they keep them as pets. In some circumstances, it can be tough to raise baby goats because the jumping can get a bit annoying.

For instance, if you’re keeping a baby goat in a house with you, then the jumping is going to run the risk of breaking stuff in the house. There are people who do think of goats as pets, but they’re honestly not well-suited for situations like this.

Goats are outdoor animals and you should probably not bring them inside. Most goat experts say that goats should be outside and among other goats so that they can thrive.

You can think of goats as pets or animal companions, but that still doesn’t change the fact that their natural environment is the best place for them. Keep your goats outside and ensure that they have all that they need so that they can do well and be healthy.

Final Thoughts

Baby goats are going to jump a lot and this is completely normal behavior. It would actually be a lot more unusual if a baby goat didn’t jump that much at all.

Goats need to learn how to jump and climb when they’re young, and they’re going to be practicing a lot. It’s also just fun for goats to jump and play, and very young goats with lots of energy will do stuff like this often.

You can have a great time raising goats if you’re interested in doing so. These animals are incredibly cute, and they can also be a lot of fun when you get used to caring for them.

That being said, you can’t raise baby goats as if they’re normal pets like cats or dogs. They simply aren’t well-suited to be kept indoors, and they need to be kept with other goats so that they can thrive.

Now that you know more about baby goats and why they like to jump, it should be easier to appreciate them. Whether you’re new to raising goats or if you just saw some videos on the Internet, it’s good to have a better understanding of the situation.

Enjoy caring for goats and appreciate the playfulness of the baby goats. They’ll settle down a bit when they get older, but goats are always going to like to jump at least a little bit.

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Author

I have a bachelor's degree in construction engineering. When I’m not constructing or remodeling X-Ray Rooms, Cardiovascular Labs, and Pharmacies, I’m at home with my wife, two daughters and a dog. Outside of family, I love grilling and barbequing on my Big Green Egg and working on projects around the house. Growing up, I had pet dogs, cats, deer, sugar gliders, chinchillas, a bird, chickens, fish, and a goat.

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